Your Keyboard Is A Live Mic (Or, If You Write It They May Say It)

(Editor’s note on July 27, 2017: Click here to go to an updated special section about the do’s and don’t's of social media.)

Reporters have always been told to never put anything in a story draft that they wouldn’t want to see in print. No jokes. No obscenities. No snotty comments. No half-formed theories. No “facts” that haven’t been double-checked.

If they need to create a file into which a story can later be pasted, that’s what “the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog” and “lorem ipsum” are for. (Look them up if you don’t know what I’m referring to or how they’re used.)

Sometimes things slip through. Romenesko tracks such mishaps.

Broadcast journalists know every mic may be live and that they shouldn’t say something they wouldn’t want to be recorded and replayed. This note is meant to draw a parallel.

The information that goes into DACS lines, scripts and Web teasers could end up as copy on our website and as language read on the air by us or a member station.

No, our drafts and DACS are not full of naughty words, snide remarks and errors. But what goes into them matters and may find its way into places you did not expect. It’s best to treat them accordingly. Your keyboard is something of a live mic.

(Memmos; Jan. 22, 2015)

January 22, 2015

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