Let’s Talk About What Journalists ‘Should’ Do

At news organizations across the U.S., including at NPR, journalists and the colleagues who support their work are talking about whether basic journalistic standards and practices still make sense.

Some argue that journalists need to “do something.” That they need to “get involved.” That they should participate in the news as well as cover it.

The other side of the discussion is that journalists, and those who support their work, are already “involved.” That there is nothing more important they could be doing than their jobs. And that it is critical that they hold true to the core principles that have worked so well.

We’re going to be talking about all this in coming days, weeks and months. At lunch, over drinks and during meetings.

We’re planning a series of Q&As with Mike Oreskes and others. The hope is that they’ll be thought-provoking discussions about journalism that everyone at NPR, including those from outside News, will benefit from. If you have suggestions about specific topics we should tackle or speakers we might want to bring in, please tell Scott Montgomery or me.

Meanwhile, as we prepare for those sessions, this is a good time to remind ourselves about the NPR view.

We do not bury the lede in the Ethics Handbook. It begins with this:

“The mission of NPR, in partnership with its member stations, is to create a more informed public, one challenged and invigorated by a deeper understanding and appreciation of events, ideas, and culture within the United States and across the globe. To this end, NPR reports, produces, acquires and distributes news, information and other content that meet the highest standards of public service in journalism and cultural expression.”

NPR, the handbook continues:

“Is at its core a news organization. Our news content, whether on the radio, on the web, or in any other form, must attain the highest quality and strengthen our credibility. We take pride in our craft. Our journalism is as accurate, fair and complete as possible. Our journalists conduct their work with honesty and respect, and they strive to be both independent and impartial in their efforts. Our methods are transparent and we will be accountable for all we do.

“We hold those who serve and influence the public to a high standard when we report about their actions. We must ask no less of ourselves. Journalism is a daily process of painting an ever truer picture of the world. Every step of this process – from reporting to editing to presenting information – may either strengthen or erode the public’s trust in us. We work hard to be worthy of that trust and to protect it.”

The key words in those passages were chosen carefully:

- “A more informed public.”

- “Public service.”

- “Credibility.”

- “Accurate, fair and complete.”

- “Honesty and respect.”

- “Independent and impartial.”

- “An ever truer picture.”

- “The public’s trust.”

Our handbook makes a strong case about the importance of our jobs. We have a unique privilege. Think of it this way: There are plenty of other people sounding off on social media, marching in the streets and organizing for or against various things.

But we get to paint those ever truer pictures. We fulfill a public service. Everyone here contributes to the effort, whether you’re part of the newsroom or not.

As we all think about these issues, here are two suggestions:

- Reread the handbook; at least the opening page.

- Revisit the NPR mission statement that Bill Siemering wrote in 1970 — a time of great unrest when many journalists were surely feeling they should “get involved.” Bill underscored the role we play in giving people the information they need to “intelligently participate” in the debates of the day. He said we should help them be “more responsive, informed human beings and intelligent responsible citizens of their communities and the world.”

More to come.

(“Memmos;” Feb. 7, 2017)

 

February 7, 2017

Comments are closed.